Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Mommy to a Spider Monkey on Crack



I love Aidric so much. I am so proud of him. He is smart, funny, sweet, and loving. But lately he is also like a spider monkey on crack. That's right. Imagine a strong and wild little beast. Now imagine that beast on crack, or speed, or meth. (I have never taken these drugs or even seen anyone in person who was on these drugs. I am going by stereotypes from TV.) I wanted to write about it because I'm not sure that many of you know what it's like.
Aidric wakes up every morning at 6:15 and hits the ground running. Literally. He cannot wait to get going, to turn something over, to climb something, to go through the drawers, to pour something out, to pull everything out of the closet, to flush the toilet a million times, to pull at my pants while I'm trying to go to the bathroom, to climb onto the back of the toilet so that he can turn on the faucet, to open and close the doors a million times, to bang on the walls and furniture with my shoe, the remote, a spoon, etc, to squish the cat, to try to stand on Daddy's head, to pull the keys off my keyboard, to get up onto the stove, and to throw the ball at the TV. This all happens at a running speed and in about 15 minutes. I am not exaggerating. He keeps this pace throughout the day.
I know some people who have what I call 'easy babies'. I am not implying that parenting is easy for anyone. I am saying that parents of these easy babies have completely different lives than mine. They can take a shower while easy baby plays with a toy next to the tub. They can eat or drink something in peace or even while sitting down. They can go shopping while easy baby laughs and coos in the stroller or cart. They can make dinner. They can go out to eat with easy baby. They can have conversations with other adults. They can go to the park or beach and relax while easy baby quietly plays. They can live without the constant responsibility of stopping disasters.
I do not feel badly in any way. I think Aidric is extraordinary, brilliant, physically advanced, and healthy. I would never want him to be anything other than who he is.
I do, however, wonder what it might be like to have one of those easy babies and would welcome some validation.

13 comments:

youhana said...

Nice

Jan said...

You need to watch "Supernanny". It's all very well having a child like this - and they are special, except that they can learn how to control themselves and if you don't start now it'll just get worse. As a teacher I've seen it plenty of times.

Kyla Hockman said...

adorable little boy I think he's so cute

sleepinl8 said...

wow. apparently the second child of most parents is supposed to be the easy one. I am the oldest of 2, and I was the really hard one. my sister just loved when people thought she was cute. I was in constant demand of attention, and any emancipation given to me would be taken waayyyy advantage of. Aidric seems to be better than I was lol. He is an adorable little toehead blondie!

Shahana said...

Your son is doing just like my one :)

Betty and Wilma said...

I was the second child. Second children are great! lol. Well, thanks for the read. I enjoy seeing thru the eyes of others. See you around!

Truck Rental said...

Great blog..love it..

shalini said...

wow!amazing!

steven said...

Your son is so cute.

What I really think... said...

ROFL! I love the spider monkey on crack. I can relate having 4 kids of my own and 3 of them being boys.My oldest is going to be 22 soon so all I have to say is treasure your little spider monkey even when he's on crack, you'll look back on these days and wish for them again. Now I'm waiting for grand children!:)

Flutter said...

I think he soounds like a lot of fun and yes I know just what it's like, my eldest child has severe ADHD and aspergers syndrome and when he was small never stopped. Which is not to to infer your little boy does.

What did happen to me though was I was blamed for his behaviour for many years, clearly I wasn't firm enough etc.

He was diagnosed at age 8, the psychiatrist told me I had done an amazing job with him and he had never known a child of that age undiagnosed who managed to stay in mainstream school. I cried.

I'm saying this because it's all too easy to judge other parents and recommend they watch super nanny etc, un seen disabilities are rarely diagnosed in small children and often go undiagnosed for many years.

Nicki said...

Hillarious....I too have an Aidric. Sounds way too familiar x

Casey said...

My little girl is the same, she's 5 and just started school. Everyone said- Well, she'll be soooo tired after school! - Err, nope.
She has sports and dancing on Thursdays and she is extra hungry but still doesn't 'stop' until she hits the pillow and you could 'Lord of the Dance' on her head without waking her up! I'm pushing her towards little Athletics. She wants our next house to have lots of stairs...